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CHINESE NEW YEAR

Chinese New Year is one of the most celebrated festival in Hong Kong. The week before New Year, homes are cleaned because many people belive a dust-free home will bring fortune. On New Year's eve, family members gather for a reunion diner.

Flower market
Chinese people decorate home with flowers that have different symbolisms. They decorate the home with fresh flowers and trees to symbolize rebirth and new growth. So the period of Lunar New Year is considered a "golden week" for florists.
Flower market

In year 2006, rising rents have forced the florists to order more stock in the hope of boosting sales ahead of the Lunar New Year, and that there is insufficient space in their shops to store the extra flowers. Landlords have raised rents by 50 per cent or even more in many cases. Many sellers import more mainland goods, which are cheaper, in the hope of making more profits to cover the rental costs. The higher the rents, the more goods the florists have to order. The more they order, the more goods they put outside our shops. Then police fines them for illegal street encroaching.

Half of the market is occupied by flower kiosks. Peach blossoms, chrysanthemum, daffodils, orchids and various kinds of flowers are available. Snacks, toys and various kinds of junk occupy the rest of the market. Bargain is recommended.
Flower market
Flower market
Victoria Park Market
Every year there are big markets in many districts in Hong Kong. The biggest one is probably the one in Victoria Park in Causeway Bay. The market typically runs a few days before the lunar new year and last until dawn of the first lunar new year day. The day before the lunar new year is the busiest and most crowded moment for the market. Hong Kong people considered it is best time to go.
Victoria Park Market

The fair attracted about 46 000 people on the eve of the lunar new year 2006.

Special miniature orange trees are sold for good luck. They are quite expensive, but the price drops rapidly at the end of the new year evening as the sellers will not be able to sell them on the next day.
Flower market
Flower market

The Lunar New Year tradition of giving new bank notes as gifts is troublesome for Hong Kong banks. There is a need of a 300 tonnes of new notes for the festivities. Lai see is usually given by parents and grandparents to younger relatives and also by bosses to employees. Celebrants prefer to give new notes in traditional red envelopes as it conveys a sense of prestige on the donor.



On the first day of the Lunar Year, Chinese people use the greeting "Kung Hei Fat Choi" to everyone they know.

Che Kung Temple
The Che Kung Temple can bring you glad tidings. Lucky windmills, lucky necklaces are on sale. Colourful paper spinning wheels, which bring good luck to your home, are available from the numerous stalls outside the temple.
Che Kung Temple

During Chinese New Year, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Che Kung Temple are crowded. Police put in place corridors to avoid stampedes.

Chinese New Year is a special time to give thanks and ask for good fortune in the coming year. Many local Hong Kong people head to Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple and let the soothsayers predict their future.
Wong Tai Sin Temple
Wong Tai Sin Temple
Wong Tai Sin Temple
On the Chinese New Year's Eve, worshippers wait outside the temple before midnight and rush in to the main altar to offer their shining incense sticks when the new year comes. They believe that the earlier they offer the incense, the better luck they will have that new year.
Wong Tai Sin Temple


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