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STREET LIFE

In Hong Kong, many shops still carry out an outdoor business such barbers, noodle stall, street food restaurants ("Dai Pai Dong"), fortune teller, papercraft master, sewer shop, refreshment shop and so on...

Economically, the elderly in Hong Kong are probably among the poorest in the population. Since most of them are not receiving any retirement pension, their only way to maintain a living is to rely on their own savings if any or the support of their children.
Elderly woman
Elderly woman
Traditional rice shop
Traditional rice shops where the rice is weighed. Wellcome and PARKnSHOP stores eliminated most traditional rice dealers. This shop closed in year 2010 and is now replaced by a Wine bar and bistro.
Traditional rice shop
Wing Woo Ho grocery store has stood there for more than 70 years and the building is even more than 100 years old. After redevelopment, only the external walls of the building will be preserved.
Wing Woo Ho grocery store
Wing Woo Ho grocery store

The grocery is selling rice, preserved vegetables, fresh eggs and chili sauce.

Wing Woo Ho grocery store
This refreshment store was located in Wan Chai. Such stores have many business difficulties against 7-11 convenience stores.
Wing Woo Ho grocery store
Mr Ho Hee Kee, located in Sheung Wan, repair umbrellas since 40 years.
Umbrella repair
Umbrella repair


A wet market is generally an open food market. The floors and surroundings are often routinely sprayed and washed with water which gave it the name "wet market".

Fruit stall
Fruits stalls prepare beautiful bunches of fruits that are offered during various events such as Lunar New Year.
Fruit stall
Fruits found in Hong Kong are mainly coming from Yau Ma Tei Wholesale Fruit Market.
Fruit stall
Fruit stall
Flowers stall
Flowers stalls prepare beautiful bunches of flowers that are offered when a new shop is opened.
Flowers stall
Dried food is a local favourite food. Smell can be very strong when walking close to these shops.
Fruit stall
Fruit stall
Central wet market
The higher hygiene standards of supermarkets have forced many wet markets to operate indoors.
Central wet market
Wet market generally combine butcher shops and fish markets in the area.
Fisheries
Fisheries
Butcher shop
Wet market products are generally stored for short periods of time and are always expected to be fresh.
Butcher shop
Market stalls are packed with local shoppers buying meat, fish and vegetables for diner.
Seafood stall
Seafood stall

In Hong Kong, there are public markets and street markets.

Seafood stall
Bazaar workers work long hours (from 4am to 8pm) throughout the year.
Seafood stall

There are signs that the younger generation are not shopping at wet markets but choose to go to supermarkets. Supermarkets had cornered more than 30 per cent of the food market in Hong Kong.

Baazar workers tended to be old workers with fairly long careers in the trades. Meat and seafood stalls are dominated by male workers, who are also younger in age compared to the others.
Meat stall
Meat stall

In year 2001 Hong Kong has more than 200 public wet markets.

Market stalls
People still enjoy the traditional shopping experience in the wet markets. Hygiene in many wet markets (air-conditioning installed) has improved to compete with the two major supermarket chains, ParknShop and Wellcome.
Market stalls
Since year 2003, bird flu has caused big impact on live chicken imports and poultry sales.
Live poultry
Live poultry
Market stalls
Traditional stalls include butcher, fisherman, flower seller, roasted food shop including pork and duck dishes.
Market stalls
Markets are losing ground to supermarkets. The two supermarkets, Wellcome and Park’n’Shop, now control more than 70% of the grocery sector.
Market stalls
Market stalls
Market stalls
In public markets, out of every seven stalls is vacant. Many of Hong Kong’s wet markets were built in the 1970s and 80s. Many of them need redesigns and renovation.
Market stalls
Hong Kong public wet markets are always worth visiting. The fluorescent lights always make nice colors on the stalls.
Seafood stall
Seafood stall
Market stalls
Expect strong smell when walking along the butcher stand. Meat is often boiled so there is no hygiene risk.
Market stalls
Fishes, shrimps and seashells are always alive in aquariums. Fishes are also kept in a lot of ice.
Seafood stall
Seafood stall
Market stalls
They are around 200 public wet market in Hong Kong. Most of them are located indoor near big estates.
Market stalls


In Hong Kong bamboo is legal and is still used in a vast majority of construction projects.
Bamboo scaffold
Bamboo scaffold

The Chinese mainland has banned the use of such scaffolds on buildings taller than six stories because of fears that the quality of bamboo has deteriorated in recent years.

Dried Seafood shop
Selling dried seafood has become a tradition. The customers are mainly middle-aged and elderly people.
Dried Seafood shop
Eating crab is immensely popular in Hong Kong. This shop is selling Shanghainese hairy crabs. They were still alive and not cooked yet. They are available for a short period during the fall season.
Crabs shop
Crabs shop
Local Chinese restaurant
In local Chinese eateries, roasted duck, BBQ pork and chicken on rice are popular dishes.
Local Chinese restaurant


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